What’s new in media and industry: Who’s who in longevity, and more

Here’s our handpicked selection of the best interviews, blog posts, popular articles, and breaking biotech news of the last two weeks: Want a systematic overview of every organization chipping away at human aging right now? Then you’ll love this nearly 800-page report from the Biogerontology Research Foundation. Put it in your queue for bedtime reading….

James Peyer: Where are stem cell therapies headed?

Someday soon we may be able to replace tissues or entire organs with those grown from a patients’ own stem cells… but just how soon? What challenges do stem cell therapies face on the path of development, as they progress from the lab to the commercial world? James Peyer, investor and former stem cell biologist, answers below…

Research roundup: Muscles from the lab, and more

We know you want to keep up with the relentless march of progress, but sometimes it’s just too relentless. So why not forget all those endlessly scrolling feeds, and instead join us for a bi-weekly concentrated dose of all the most exciting developments in the field of geroscience? Here’s what’s happened in the last two weeks:…

Are cancer prevention and cellular reprogramming really enemies?

Imagine a physiological love triangle: in one corner, a force with the weight of millions of years of evolutionary programming trained on preventing runaway replication; in the other, the set of epigenetic regulators that must maintain the ability of stem cells to churn out whatever kind of cell they need to. At first glance, the…

The Hallmarks of Aging: Epigenetic Alterations

All cells in your body have the same DNA, yet they express different proteins and do different things. How does that happen?  Various alterations in your cells affect the expression of genes, without altering their contents.  This is known as epigenetics. Cells of different tissue types have different epigenetic alterations that lead them to produce…

Cheat codes for youthful cells

For much of the 20th century, the prevailing wisdom was that once cells were fully differentiated, their identities were crystallized eternally–a neuron was a neuron forever, and that was that. Then in 1987, something almost magical happened for the first time: with the help of a single transcription factor, a mature fibroblast was completely remade…

Out with the old, in with the… old?

(Part I of II.) Researchers at UNC Chapel Hill had an interesting mission: first, transform scar tissue (like the kind that forms after heart attacks) into ordinary cardiac muscle. Researchers at UNC Chapel Hill Of course, that wasn’t the interesting part. We’ve been able to transform cells of one type into cells of another, completely…

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