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CLEVELAND–There’s a low-tech problem troubling the high-tech world of digital pathology imaging.

The issue: Even as digital pathology makes rapid advances worldwide–with more physicians analyzing tissue images on “smart” computers to diagnose patients–there are no reliable standards for the preparation and digitization of the tissue slides themselves.

That means poor quality slides get mixed in with clear and accurate slides, potentially confusing or misleading a computer program trying to learn what a cancerous cell looks like, for example.

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University are trying to change that.

Bioengineering researcher Anant Madabhushi and Andrew Janowczyk, a senior research fellow in Madabhushi’s Center for Computational Imaging and Personal Diagnostics, have developed a program that they say will ensure the quality of digital images being used for diagnostic and research purposes.

The two unveiled their new quality-control tool in the most recent edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology Clinical Informatics and are being supported by a three-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute.

The new tool incorporates a series of measurements and classifiers to help users flag corrupted images and help retain those that will aid technicians and physicians in their diagnoses.

“The idea is simple: assess

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