Mitochondrial Dysfunction as a Contributing Cause of Osteoporosis
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Bone is constantly remodeled throughout life through the actions of osteoblasts, cells that build bone, and osteoclasts, cells that break down bone. The proximate cause of osteoporosis, the age-related loss of bone mass and strength, is a growing imbalance between these cell types that favors osteoclasts. Why does this happen? Chronic inflammation generated by the presence of senescent cells appears to be one cause, as cells react to inflammation in ways that favor osteoclast ativity over osteoblast activity. Researchers here provide evidence for the age-related decline in mitochondrial function to be important as well, another mechanism that ensures more osteoclasts than osteoblasts are introduced into bone tissue.

osteoblastsosteoclastsosteoporosisChronic inflammation generated by the presence of senescent cellsinflammationage-related decline in mitochondrial function

Some risk factors for osteoporosis such as being older and female or having a family history of the condition cannot be avoided. But others can, like smoking cigarettes, consuming alcohol, taking certain medications, or being exposed to environmental pollutants. But until now researchers haven’t gained a firm picture of how these exposures link up with bone loss. A new study reveals a mechanism by which these factors and osteoporosis may be linked. Damage to mitochondria – key cellular

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