About Steve Hill

Steve serves on the LEAF Board of Directors and is the Editor in Chief, coordinating the daily news articles and social media content of the organization. He is an active journalist in the aging research and biotechnology field and has to date written over 500 articles on the topic as well as attending various medical industry conferences. In 2019 he was listed in the top 100 journalists covering biomedicine and longevity research in the industry report – Top-100 Journalists covering advanced biomedicine and longevity created by the Aging Analytics Agency. His work has been featured in H+ magazine, Psychology Today, Singularity Weblog, Standpoint Magazine, and, Keep me Prime, and New Economy Magazine. Steve has a background in project management and administration which has helped him to build a united team for effective fundraising and content creation, while his additional knowledge of biology and statistical data analysis allows him to carefully assess and coordinate the scientific groups involved in the project. In 2015 he led the Major Mouse Testing Program (MMTP) for the International Longevity Alliance and in 2016 helped the team of the SENS Research Foundation to reach their goal for the OncoSENS campaign for cancer research.
Posts from the author

In a small, recent human trial, a naturally occurring compound called urolithin A has yielded positive results and appears to slow down part of the aging process that is related to the production of energy in our cells. What is urolithin A? Urolithin A is the end product created when bacteria in the gut break…

We are drawing close now to the Ending Age-Related Diseases Conference in New York City, so with less than a month before the big day, today is the ideal time to have a look at what has been happening. Tickets are priced at only $500 and include access to two action-packed days of aging research…

Today, we want to point out a new publication that recently appeared in the Science Translational Medicine journal, as its authors have discovered a new mechanism by which the brain protects itself from the harmful α-synuclein protein aggregates associated with Parkinson’s and that may open the door to new therapies against these conditions. To understand…

A new publication highlights how the complex interaction of NAD+ and cellular senescence pathways may complicate proposed anti-aging therapies that boost NAD+ using precursors. What are epigenetic alterations? One of the proposed reasons we age is the changes to gene expression that our cells experience as we get older; these are commonly called epigenetic alterations….

The gut microbiome appears to be increasingly responsible for at least some of the decline of the immune system during aging, and a new mouse study shows that it is reversible. The gut microbiome The microbiome describes a varied community of bacteria, archaea, eukarya, and viruses that inhabit our guts. The four bacterial phyla of…

Not so long ago, it was my 44th birthday, and I’ve finally decided to write something that I’ve been reflecting on for a while. To some people, a birthday is a cause for celebration; for others, it is viewed as a bad thing. Yes, if you take the negative view, you could see it as…

Today, we wish to highlight a new open access publication in which the researchers take a novel approach to the regeneration of the thymus, a small but vitally important organ that is key to our immune system. The thymus shrinks as we age The thymus is one of the most important organs in the body,…

A group of Spanish researchers, including Dr. Maria Blasco and others at the CNIO, have published a new study that examines the consequences of short telomeres and telomerase deficiency on the brain [1]. This study addresses an aspect of telomere attrition, one of the primary hallmarks of aging. Telomeres are repeating sequences of DNA (TTAGGG)…

The researchers of a new publication take a look at the effects of obesity on aging and consider its impact in the context of the Hallmarks of Aging, a popular theory that breaks down aging into nine distinct processes. The case for obesity accelerating aging Being overweight and carrying excessive amounts of visceral fat, a…

For the May Journal Club, Dr. Medvedik and guests took a look at the recent publication by the Spiegel Lab at Yale University where two forms of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were successfully cleaved. We also covered this important breakthrough in our article – Reversal of Two Advanced Glycation End Products Achieved. Abstract Advanced glycation end products…

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