About Steve Hill

Steve serves on the LEAF Board of Directors and is the Editor in Chief, coordinating the daily news articles and social media content of the organization. He is an active journalist in the aging research and biotechnology field and has to date written over 500 articles on the topic as well as attending various medical industry conferences. In 2019 he was listed in the top 100 journalists covering biomedicine and longevity research in the industry report – Top-100 Journalists covering advanced biomedicine and longevity created by the Aging Analytics Agency. His work has been featured in H+ magazine, Psychology Today, Singularity Weblog, Standpoint Magazine, and, Keep me Prime, and New Economy Magazine. Steve has a background in project management and administration which has helped him to build a united team for effective fundraising and content creation, while his additional knowledge of biology and statistical data analysis allows him to carefully assess and coordinate the scientific groups involved in the project. In 2015 he led the Major Mouse Testing Program (MMTP) for the International Longevity Alliance and in 2016 helped the team of the SENS Research Foundation to reach their goal for the OncoSENS campaign for cancer research.
Posts from the author

A team of researchers, including Dr. David Sinclair, has recently made a new study available as a preprint prior to peer review and publication in the journal Cell. DNA damage and the double-strand break Two of the primary hallmarks of aging are genomic instability, which consists of damage to our DNA, and epigenetic alterations, which…

Come and join Dr. Aubrey de Grey, Dr. Amutha Boominathan, Dr. Matthew O’Connor, and others from the SENS Research Foundation team as they answer your questions about aging research on October 25th. Time: 9 am PDT / 12 pm EDT / 5 pm UK On the day of the event simply join the SENS AMA Webinar or…

Back in January, we were joined by Dr. Aubrey de Grey, Dr. Amutha Boominathan, Dr. Matthew O’Conner, and Michael Rae from the SENS Research Foundation for a webinar discussion panel focused on MitoSENS, the mitochondrial repair program. During the webinar, a number of points were discussed, and the Lifespan Heroes in the audience got to…

A recent study suggests that circulating glucuronic acid may be a useful predictor of both lifespan and healthspan in humans and mice. What is glucuronic acid? Glucuronic acid is a metabolite of glucose and is critical for the detoxification of xenobiotic substances. These are compounds that are not naturally produced, should not normally be in…

A small-scale human trial by Mayo Clinic researchers has shown for the first time that harmful senescent cells that accumulate with age can be removed from the body by senolytic drugs. This has been demonstrated many times already in mice, but this is the first confirmation that these drugs remove senescent cells in the same…

Today, we have launched the MitoMouse project on our fundraising platform Lifespan.io. This project aims to reverse the damage that aging does to the mitochondrial DNA and to restore energy production in our cells with the goal of preventing age-related ill health. The power stations of the cell The mitochondria are the power stations of…

At our 2019 Ending Age-related Diseases conference in New York City, we had the pleasure of speaking with Dr. Michael West, the CEO of AgeX Therapeutics. Dr. West can rightfully be called a pioneer in his field with a substantial background in biomedical and biotechnology corporations. After completing his PhD at Baylor College of Medicine,…

For the September Journal Club, we are taking a look at the new human trial data from the recent senolytics trial at Mayo Clinic, a follow-on study from its previous human trial targeting IPF. This time, the researchers ran a study to see how senolytics influenced diabetic kidney disease and if it actually removes senescent…

Researchers at the Buck Institute, including Dr. Judy Campisi, have published a new study that shows, for the first time, that senescent cells are associated with age-related blood clots [1]. As we get older, increasing numbers of our cells enter into a state known as cellular senescence. Senescent cells do not divide or support the…

Researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated that exosomes harvested from human skin cells can repair sun-damaged skin cells in mice. The therapy also appears to be more effective than retinol and stem cell treatment, and best of all, delivery of the therapy is needle-free. What are exosomes? Exosomes are essentially membrane-wrapped packages that…

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