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For the June edition of Journal Club, we will be taking a look at the recent paper entitled “Changes at the nuclear lamina alter binding of pioneer factor Foxa2 in aged liver“. We summarized the research in an article earlier this month.

Summary
Increasing evidence suggests that regulation of heterochromatin at the nuclear envelope underlies metabolic disease susceptibility and age‐dependent metabolic changes, but the mechanism is unknown. Here, we profile lamina‐associated domains (LADs) using lamin B1 ChIP‐Seq in young and old hepatocytes and find that, although lamin B1 resides at a large fraction of domains at both ages, a third of lamin B1‐associated regions are bound exclusively at each age in vivo. Regions occupied by lamin B1 solely in young livers are enriched for the forkhead motif, bound by Foxa pioneer factors. We also show that Foxa2 binds more sites in Zmpste24 mutant mice, a progeroid laminopathy model, similar to increased Foxa2 occupancy in old livers. Aged and Zmpste24‐deficient livers share several features, including nuclear lamina abnormalities, increased Foxa2 binding, de‐repression of PPAR‐ and LXR‐dependent gene expression, and fatty liver. In old livers, additional Foxa2 binding is correlated to loss of lamin B1 and heterochromatin (H3K9me3 occupancy) at these loci. Our observations suggest that changes at the nuclear lamina are linked to altered Foxa2 binding, enabling opening of chromatin and de‐repression of genes encoding lipid synthesis and storage targets that contribute to etiology of hepatic steatosis.

Whitton, H., Singh, L. N., Patrick, M. A., Price, A. J., Osorio, F. G., López‐Otín, C., & Bochkis, I. M. (2018). Changes at the nuclear lamina alter binding of pioneer factor Foxa2 in aged liver. Aging cell17(3), e12742.

About the author

Steve Hill

Steve serves on the LEAF Board of Directors and is the Editor in Chief, coordinating the daily news articles and social media content of the organization. He is an active journalist in the aging research and biotechnology field and has to date written over 500 articles on the topic as well as attending various medical industry conferences. In 2019 he was listed in the top 100 journalists covering biomedicine and longevity research in the industry report – Top-100 Journalists covering advanced biomedicine and longevity created by the Aging Analytics Agency. His work has been featured in H+ magazine, Psychology Today, Singularity Weblog, Standpoint Magazine, and, Keep me Prime, and New Economy Magazine. Steve has a background in project management and administration which has helped him to build a united team for effective fundraising and content creation, while his additional knowledge of biology and statistical data analysis allows him to carefully assess and coordinate the scientific groups involved in the project. In 2015 he led the Major Mouse Testing Program (MMTP) for the International Longevity Alliance and in 2016 helped the team of the SENS Research Foundation to reach their goal for the OncoSENS campaign for cancer research.
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