In a study at King’s College London, scientists have shown that a vicious circle in which the ill-famed amyloid-beta protein stimulates its own production might be a key factor in the etiology of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease; furthermore, a drug known as fasudil seems to be effective against amyloid-beta in a mice model of the…

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic have implicated senescent cells in yet another age-related pathology—namely, Alzheimer’s disease. Led by Dr. Darren Baker, the Mayo Clinic team discovered that clearing senescent microglia and astrocytes in murine brains leads to a much better prognosis for neurodegenerative disease [1]. Study abstract Cellular senescence, which is characterized by an irreversible…

According to a study led by scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital, exercise-induced neurogenesis improves cognition in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, yielding more benefits than drug-induced adult neurogenesis. The scientists were able to figure out the difference between the two types of induced neurogenesis and pharmacologically reproduce the same benefits provided by exercise [1]….

For the first time in an animal model, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University showed that the tau pathology that accompanies Alzheimer’s disease can be reversed using the asthma drug zileuton [1]. Abstract Previous studies showed that the leukotrienes pathway is increased in human tauopathy and that its manipulation may…

Vascular risk appears to be a strong predictor of dementia, especially in older individuals with high levels of brain beta-amyloids, and the interaction between these two risk factors might lead to a higher rate of cognitive decline, according to a recent study at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurological disorder…

In April, we talked about new Alzheimer’s research showing how the gene variant ApoE4 greatly increases the risk of developing the disease, and we discussed how researchers have converted the defective gene back to its original form to cut the risk of Alzheimer’s.

A new open access paper takes a look at the potential of regenerative medicine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease [1]. The review covers approaches such as spurring the production of new neurons and transplanting new neurons while taking a look at the disease-modeling approaches and techniques that science is now using to refine approaches…

Researchers at Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco report that a gene variant associated with Alzheimer’s works differently in mice and humans, and they also demonstrate how modifying this gene could potentially prevent the plaques associated with Alzheimer’s from forming and damaging the brain. The new study was published in the journal Nature in January 2018 [1]….

Dr. Oliver Medvedik will be hosting the next edition of Journal Club on Tuesday, April 19th at 13:00 EST. We will be discussing new research published in nature where researchers modified a protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease into a more harmless form, allowing them to remove the damage caused by Alzheimer’s in human cells. This…

New research from the University of Southern California has shed light on how the decline of the brain’s vascular system precedes the build-up of the plaques and tau tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease. A leaky blood-brain barrier sets the scene for dementia Traditionally, many researchers have focused their efforts on the amyloid and tau proteins…

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