A research team led by Professor Johann de Bono at the Institute of Cancer Research, London has successfully tested a new drug that has infiltrated different forms of cancer in an ongoing human trial [1]. The drug is called tisotumab vedotin (TV) and works like a ‘Trojan Horse’ by hiding a cancer-killing payload inside an…

Researchers at UCLA have managed to guide pluripotent stem cells into becoming adult T cells, the cells that patrol the body to kill cancer and other diseases and that are trained in our thymi. The study, published in Cell Stem Cell, was led by senior author Gay Crooks, M.D., a professor of pathology and laboratory…

A study by scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre unveiled a mechanism through which deadly glioblastomas can metastasize. The research has been published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics [1]. Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive and heterogeneous form of primary brain tumors, driven by a complex repertoire of…

In a study published in the journal Immunology, Southampton University researchers have shown that a new antibody that they have engineered is able to combine two different anticancer approaches: depleting regulatory T cells and activating killer T cells [1]. Abstract The costimulatory receptor 4-1BB is expressed on activated immune cells, including activated T cells. Antibodies…

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame discovered that amino acid nitration can inhibit the activation of T cells employed in immunotherapy against cancer and that suppression of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) responsible for nitration can significantly boost the effectiveness of immunotherapy [1]. Abstract Potent immunosuppressive mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment contribute to the resistance…

Scientists at the MRC Cancer Unit of the Wellcome Sanger Institute and other departments of the University of Cambridge discovered that healthy esophageal tissue accumulates very high numbers of mutations with age, to the point that, by the time middle age is reached, it is likely to contain more cells with a particular mutation than…

Cancer is the poster child of age-related diseases, and a recent study sheds light on why the risk of cancer rises dramatically as we age. Abstract For many cancer types, incidence rises rapidly with age as an apparent power law, supporting the idea that cancer is caused by a gradual accumulation of genetic mutations. Similarly,…

Earlier this year, we hosted the Ending Age-Related Diseases 2018 conference at the Cooper Union in New York City. This conference was designed to bring together the best in the aging research and biotech investment worlds and saw a range of industry experts sharing their insights. Dr. James Peyer is the founder and Managing Partner…

Researchers at the Imperial College London have discovered that specifically employing invariant natural killer T cells, rather than generic T cells, in cancer immunotherapies based on chimeric antigen receptors might lead to significantly more effective, cheaper, and more easily mass-produced treatments [1]. Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor anti-CD19 (CAR19)-T cell immunotherapy-induced clinical remissions in CD19+ B…

Led by Dr. Alicja Copik, scientists at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine have discovered that it might be possible to make cancer immunotherapy work for a larger portion of patients by employing PM21-activated natural killer (PM21-NK) cells [1]. Study abstract Anti-PD-1/anti-PD-L1 therapies have shown success in cancer treatment but responses are limited…

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