Researchers at the Imperial College London have discovered that specifically employing invariant natural killer T cells, rather than generic T cells, in cancer immunotherapies based on chimeric antigen receptors might lead to significantly more effective, cheaper, and more easily mass-produced treatments [1]. Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor anti-CD19 (CAR19)-T cell immunotherapy-induced clinical remissions in CD19+ B…

Led by Dr. Alicja Copik, scientists at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine have discovered that it might be possible to make cancer immunotherapy work for a larger portion of patients by employing PM21-activated natural killer (PM21-NK) cells [1]. Study abstract Anti-PD-1/anti-PD-L1 therapies have shown success in cancer treatment but responses are limited…

Today, we would like to share a talk given by Stephen Hilbert, President of Oisin Biotechnologies, in which he discusses treating aging and cancer by removing harmful senescent cells. On July 12th, we hosted our first conference, Ending Age-Related Diseases: Investment Prospects & Advances in Research, at the Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, which is part…

Researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Cancer Therapeutics CRC have developed a new type of drug that harnesses cellular senescence as a weapon against cancer [1]. Study abstract Acetylation of histones by lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) is essential for chromatin organization and function. Among the genes coding…

Researchers at the Rockefeller University have clarified the mechanism by which certain types of breast cancer become immune to specific drugs designed to eliminate them. More specifically, they figured out how the loss of the protein 53BP1 due to BRCA1 mutation allows cancers to become insensitive to PARP inhibitors [1]. Study summary In DNA repair,…

Two papers authored by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco described the genetic changes that turn harmless moles into malignant melanomas and the experiment they devised to recreate the step-by-step evolution of normal skin cells into cancer cells [1], [2]. Summary ([1]) We elucidated genomic and transcriptomic changes that accompany the evolution of…

According to a new study published in the journal Cell Metabolism, it might be possible to attack cancer by exploiting its own cellular metabolism rather than by employing drugs to kill cancerous cells directly [1]. Study summary Although breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) display plasticity transitioning between quiescent mesenchymal-like (M) and proliferative epithelial-like (E) states,…

Researchers have manipulated the immune system to respond more aggressively to cancer according to a new study [1]. Manipulating macrophages We have discussed modulating the immune system multiple times recently, especially in regards to macrophages and manipulating their behavior. Macrophages are part of the innate immune system and carry out a wide variety of tasks,…

A team at the Institute of Cancer Research in London led by Dr. Barbara Tanos has found out that cellular organelles known as “cilia” may be a viable target for undermining many cancers’ drug resistance [1]. Study summary Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that detect mechanical and chemical stimuli. Although cilia house a number of…

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the University of Kansas, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) have discovered a compound that can block the spread of some types of cancer cells. Preventing cancer metastasis Metastasis is how cancer spreads from an initial site to a secondary site within the host’s body;…

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